Nigeria

Thursday May 5, 2016

Bill in Kaduna State, Nigeria Would Criminalize Street Evangelism, 'Offensive' Preaching, Clergy Say

Legislation targets Christianity, church leaders say.By Our Nigeria Correspondent
KADUNA, Nigeria, May 4, 2016 (Morning Star News) – Street evangelists would be fined and “offensive” preaching at church services would send pastors to jail for up to two years under legislation proposed by the Muslim governor of Kaduna state, church leaders said.

As discussion of the legislation heated up in the past month, Christian leaders voiced alarm over the bill Gov. Nasir El-Rufai sent to the state assembly last October, which would also require clergy to obtain a preaching permit renewable every year. Church leaders said the Religious Regulation Bill, which would apply to all religions including Islam, is a ploy to stifle and persecute Christians under the guise of quelling extremists and charlatans.

“The proposed law is in contravention of the Nigerian Constitution and shall inhibit the preaching of the gospel when it becomes operational,” the Rev. George Dodo, chairman of the Kaduna State Chapter of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN) and Roman Catholic bishop of Zaria Diocese, told Morning Star News. “We have reservations over the bill and believe that it will curtail religious freedom of the people, particularly, Christians in Kaduna state.”

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News from the Frontlines

Wednesday May 4, 2016

Christians in Burma Patiently Endure Building of Pagodas on Church Lands

Buddhist monk said to be using structures for religious, political aims.By Our Burma Correspondent
YANGON, Burma, May 3, 2016 (Morning Star News) – Striving for a peaceful legacy, Christians in Burma (also called Myanmar) are choosing to patiently endure an influential Buddhist monk’s campaign to build pagodas on church properties.
Initially social media and news media registered an outcry from Christians when U Thuzana, a powerful monk better known as Myaing Kyee Ngu Sayadaw, rallied supporters to build a Buddhist pagoda on Anglican church property in southeastern Karen state on April 23 – the third Buddhist shrine that he has erected on church lands.

A bishop at St. Mark Anglican Church, where the pagoda was built in Kun Taw Gyi village, said Christian leaders don’t want to inflame religious and ethnic conflicts in a country where a newly-elected democratic government is striving for national reconciliation; besides trying to quell ethnic separatist movements, officials have had to deflect Burmese Buddhist rancor over the Assembly-election of an ethnic Chin Christian as vice president, Henry Van Thio.
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News from the Frontlines

Wednesday May 4, 2016

Woman in Uganda Says Muslims Beat, Raped Her for Accusing Imam of Killing Her Father

Christian, 22, seriously wounded after testifying. By Our East Africa Correspondent
NAIROBI, Kenya, April 30, 2016 (Morning Star News) – Muslims in eastern Uganda beat and raped a young Christian woman for testifying that a mosque leader killed her father because of his faith, sources said.
The imam at a mosque in Kanyumu village, Pallisa District, Sheikh Musana Ibrahim, and two other Muslims killed Samson Mukama on Jan. 28, according to his daughter.

The 22-year-old woman, whose name is withheld, said she was beaten and raped on April 19 for telling a court what she had witnessed. She was found unconscious in a pool of blood, with several cuts on her body, after the attack on her that evening at the home in which she had taken refuge in Kanginima village, Pallisa District.
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Nigeria

Wednesday April 27, 2016

Muslim Fulani Herdsmen Massacres Reach Southern Nigeria

With or apart from Islamic extremist groups, violence said to pose threat of civil war.By Our Nigeria Correspondent
JOS, Nigeria, April 27, 2016 (Morning Star News) – Muslim Fulani attacks on Christians have advanced beyond Nigeria’s central zone into a southern state, with a church leader saying the aggression could cast Nigeria into civil war as a massacre this week took at least 27 lives.

Following the February massacre in Agatu, in the central-eastern state of Benue, and the attack on Monday (April 25) on three predominantly Christian villages in the south-eastern state of Enugu, church and rights figures began to describe Muslim Fulani aggression as posing a threat of civil war. Enugu shares a border with Benue.

While a secessionist group called for Enugu natives to defend against further Fulani attacks, the archbishop of Enugu Ecclesiastical Province, Church of Nigeria, Anglican Communion, said Muslim Fulani killings, kidnappings, destruction of farmland and rape have become a regular occurrence in central and southern parts of Nigeria.
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